Frequently Asked Questions

FAQs

Most people will know via

1. A warning light appears in your wing mirror to alert you of a vehicle in your blind spot,

or

2. Your cruise control enables you to keep a certain distance from the car in front e.g., they slow down, so you do

or

3. there is a visible camera on the windscreen which is a manufactured accessory with the car.

Different ADAS systems use different manufacturers for their systems. They also give their systems different names or acronyms to reflect what they do. However, they all generally use the same technology to do the same things.

 In some vehicles yes. Others no. Sometimes you can “lessen the impact” which ADAS has on the control of your vehicle. E.g., Adaptive cruise is an “opt in” system meaning that it isn’t on when you start the vehicle. BSM (Blind spot monitoring) is an “opt out” meaning it is on as soon as you start the ignition and if you don’t like the system, you can turn it off. Something akin to Lane Departure Warnings come with a few indicators on certain vehicles like vibrating steering wheels and seats as you veer out of your lane. These ancillary indicators can often be turned off, but the visual warning display can be left on.

In some vehicles yes. Others no. Sometimes you can “lessen the impact” ADAS has on the control of your vehicle. E.g., Adaptive cruise is an “opt in” system meaning that it isn’t on when you start the vehicle. BSM (Blind spot monitoring) is an “opt out” meaning it is on as soon as you start the ignition and if you don’t like the system, you can turn it off. Something akin to Lane Departure Warnings come with a few indicators on certain vehicles like vibrating steering wheels and seats as you veer out of your lane. These ancillary indicators can often be turned off, but the visual warning display can be left on.

Only specially trained ADAS Technicians can recalibrate ADAS systems. There are new laws in some states being moved to ensure this is going to be legally binding as part of a wider movement to gain regulation within the auto glass sector.

Yes and no. The term “recalibrates itself” is a misnomer. They are what’s called “self-learning” systems. These systems need to be put into a learning cycle where certain criteria are met, often after doing a static base line recalibration for the system to “learn” the road as it is being driven on. Only certain systems can do this. Therefore, only trained ADAS technicians should be doing ADAS recalibrations.

Not really. As mentioned before, there are some settings that can be turned off by the user in the vehicle settings, or it can be done by our ADAS technicians. Customisations regarding longer detection range etc is a pre-set value from the manufacturer and must be calibrated to these settings.

The systems which Aussie ADAS & Glass utilise provide approximately 95% coverage of vehicles on the market. Please call us on 1300 271 775 to find out whether we can complete the re-calibration on your vehicle.

Contact Aussie ADAS & Glass as soon as possible. If you can get a screenshot of the symbol and make a note of the driving conditions that were experienced when the icon displayed.

**Remember adverse weather can cause some ADAS systems to malfunction due to radar interference and lack of visibility. 

N.B: ADAPTIVE CRUISE CONTROL SHOULD NOT BE USED IN CITIES AND/OR IN ADVERSE CONDTITIONS.

Contact Aussie ADAS & Glass as soon as possible. If you can get a screenshot of the symbol and make a note of the driving conditions that were experienced when the icon displayed. **Remember adverse weather can cause some ADAS systems to malfunction due to radar interference and lack of visibility. ADAPTIVE CRUISE CONTROL SHOULD NOT BE USED IN CITIES AND/OR IN ADVERSE CONDTITIONS.

Totally false. To replace the screen, the camera must be recalibrated, so it relearns how to see through the glass. Even on Eyesight Tech equipped vehicles where the camera is turret mounted and never gets removed, the biopic system that it is needs to know what is between it and the objects it is looking for and must adjust to any visual warping of the line of sight.

Only specifically trained ADAS Technicians can recalibrate ADAS systems. Some vehicles make use of data point boards on a static level to recalibrate and if someone accesses the ADAS systems and doesn’t have these boards it can wipe the system of its data and need a complete reprograming.

Unfortunately, no. These ADAS systems are part of the whole vehicles electrics and are intertwined with numerous other systems in the vehicle. As such to add 1 part would mean replacing numerous other systems and ECUs in the vehicle and as such these high functioning ADAS systems are only available at the time of vehicle manufacture.

Most calibrations can be done within 1 hour. Some can take as long as 4 hours. Recalibrating multiple systems can take even longer. Some Subaru’s have taken over 2 hours of actual driving time to complete their dynamic recalibration.

ADAS stands for Advanced Driver Assistance Systems. As the name suggests, they are there to assist the driver in emergency situations, prevent fatigue and make the drive experience safer and less taxing.

Self-Drive vehicles incorporate ADAS in conjunction with things like 360-degree LIDAR and fully automated steering systems to allow the vehicle to drive with minimal input from the driver themselves. There are 6 levels of ADAS (0-5) with level 0 being no ADAS at all and level 5 being full self-drive where everyone is a passenger.

Most ADAS equipped vehicles are equipped with either level 1 or 2 which means human input is still required to steer but safety features can prevent accidents. Level 3 and 4 is where the systems can use the steering wheel to navigate in place of the driver or with minimal input from the driver, but they still must be present.

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